The British resistance

At a more advanced stage of the battle, the United Kingdom arrived in a situation of extreme need. There was no more contingent of pilots, recruits with little more than two hours of flight were taken to the front line and were shot down very easily by German pilots, who had the largest air force Read More …

Statistics

In retrospect, the Battle of England is considered closed on October 31, 1940, when the German command “postponed indefinitely” the large-scale daytime bombing of the United Kingdom,[9] although the nighttime bombings continued sporadically until the eve of Operation Barbarossa. In numerical terms, the RAF lost 1 023 aircraft (all fighters), while the Luftwaffe 1 887 Read More …

Airborne Blitz

The German command’s determination to fight back the air attack on Berlin played a decisive role in the battle. This was because for the first week of September, the British air fighter command was on the verge of collapse. Having so far concentrated its attacks on RAF airfields and radar stations, the Luftwaffe’s goal of Read More …